What does an intermediate success rate mean? An analysis of a Piagetian liquid conservation task in the great apes

C Suda*, J Call

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study investigates what an intermediate success rate means in bonobos, chimpanzees, and orangutans. Apes participated in liquid conservation experiments where they had to track the larger of two different quantities of juice after various kinds of transformations [Suda, C., & Call, J. (2004). Piagetian liquid conservation in the great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, and Pongo pygmaeus). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 118, 265-279). When making a decision, apes sometimes demonstrated hesitant behavior, concurrently pointing to both alternatives or successively changing their choice. Moderately Successful apes showed more hesitation than highly Successful or unsuccessful apes. The results are consistent with the cognitive conflict model: The experiments created a higher decree of cognitive conflict on moderately successful apes than on very Successful or unsuccessful apes. This indicates that an intermediate performance reflects the joint operation and potential conflict between two different cognitive strategies (identity and appearance) inherent to the Piagetian conservation task. (C) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-71
Number of pages19
JournalCognition
Volume99
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006
Event20th Congress of the International-Primatological-Society - Torino, Italy
Duration: 1 Aug 2004 → …

Keywords

  • hesitation
  • cognitive conflict
  • intermediate success
  • ORANGUTANS PONGO-PYGMAEUS
  • MONKEYS MACACA-MULATTA
  • CHIMPANZEES (PAN-TROGLODYTES)/
  • PERCEPTUAL STRATEGIES
  • UNCERTAIN RESPONSE
  • HUMANS
  • TROGLODYTES
  • METACOGNITION
  • ANIMALS

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