What do epidemiologists mean by 'population mixing'?

Graham R. Law, Richard G. Feltbower, John C. Taylor, Roger C. Parslow, Mark S. Gilthorpe, Paul Boyle, Patricia A. McKinney

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There is growing evidence that some chronic diseases are caused, or promoted, by infectious disease. 'Population mixing' has been used as a proxy for the range and dose of infectious agents circulating in a community. Given the speculation over the role of population mixing in many chronic diseases, we review the various methods used for measuring population mixing, and provide a classification of these. We recommend that authors fulfill two criteria in publications: measures are demonstrably associated with the putative risk factors for which population-mixing is acting as a proxy and fundamental characteristics of the chosen measures are clearly defined.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)155-160
    Number of pages6
    JournalPediatric Blood & Cancer
    Volume51
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

    Keywords

    • census
    • epidemiology
    • infections
    • leukemia
    • population mixing
    • ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA
    • NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA
    • OCCUPATIONAL CONTACT LEVEL
    • CHILDHOOD ACUTE-LEUKEMIA
    • INFANT-DEATH-SYNDROME
    • DAY-CARE
    • INFECTIOUS-DISEASES
    • RADIATION WORKERS
    • GEOGRAPHICAL-DISTRIBUTION
    • INFLUENZAE DISEASE

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