Well-being in cross-cultural transitions: discrepancies between acculturation preferences and actual intergroup and intragroup contact

M.R. Ramos, C. Cassidy, S. Reicher, S.A. Haslam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies examined the effect of acculturation-contact discrepancies on well-being. Specifically, we tested the prediction that well-being will be compromised when cultural minorities' acculturation preferences are not met by the intergroup and intragroup contact in a new society. Study 1 found that for Polish immigrants (n=55) acculturation-contact discrepancies were associated with compromised well-being. Study 2 followed a cohort of international students (n=106) for a period of two academic years. Results suggested that discrepancies in students' acculturation-contact in their first year had harmful consequences for their well-being 1 year later. Overall, the two studies show that discrepancies between acculturation preferences and actual contact have negative implications for the psychological adaptation of acculturating individuals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-34
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume45
Issue number1
Early online date1 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

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