Visegrad and Ukraine since Maidan 2013-2014 and the Russian invasion of 2022

Rick Fawn*, Iuliia Drobysh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Visegrad and Ukraine matter to each other. That relationship offers mutual lessons on wider affairs, especially after revolution, war and territorial occupation that Ukraine has endured since 2014. This article examines why and how Ukraine came to place great confidence in Visegrad and identifies five ways in which Visegrad gave Ukraine vital political, material and even existential support. Nevertheless, a separate five gaps are identified in perceptions and expectations that reveal changes in Ukrainian understandings of Visegrad’s capacity and willingness to support it. The salience of those lessons extends beyond this important if overlooked European security relationship.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages25
JournalEurope-Asia Studies
VolumeLatest Articles
Early online date4 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Jul 2023

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