Vigilance benefits and competition costs in groups: do individual redshanks gain an overall foraging benefit?

A. Sansom, Will Cresswell, Jeroen Minderman, J. Lind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animals gain antipredation benefits from being in larger groups through increased probability of predator detection, dilution of individual risk of being attacked and confusion of predators during attack. A further benefit is that individuals in larger groups can decrease the amount of time they spend being vigilant, while maintaining a high probability of predator detection. They may then gain extra time to forage, so increasing overall intake rate. Increasing group size, however, can also increase competition so that intake rates decrease. We investigated whether there was a foraging benefit in redshanks, Tringa totanus, that show the group size decrease in individual vigilance. Intake rates did not change with group size, despite an increase in time spent foraging. Interference competition increased with group size because individuals travelled more to find prey. Redshanks used the extra time available to forage to maintain intake rates under increased competition. Although the group size effect on vigilance did not accrue direct foraging benefits, larger groups formed, conferring other antipredation benefits. Intake rates were maintained because the interference competition was compensated by the benefits of reduced individual vigilance. (c) 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1869-1875
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume75
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

Keywords

  • antipredation
  • group size effect
  • interference competition
  • predator detection
  • redshank
  • Tringa totanus
  • GROUP-SIZE
  • TRINGA-TOTANUS
  • INTERFERENCE COMPETITION
  • ANTIPREDATORY VIGILANCE
  • PREDATION MORTALITY
  • FEEDING LOCATION
  • BLACKBIRDS
  • BEHAVIOR
  • CHOICE
  • RISK

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