Victims of terrorism and political violence: identity, needs, and service delivery in Northern Ireland and Great Britain

O. Lynch, J. Argomaniz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Terrorism and political violence exist fundamentally as communicative acts; inherently the acts themselves serve to inspire anxiety and fear. As the recipients of such a communicative act, victims of terrorism and political violence serve as the vehicle for the dissemination of these communications to both the intended and broader audiences. Their victimising experience is thus a complex interplay between a profound personal trauma and the political/communicative dimension of the attack. Given this complexity, this article addresses how victims’ needs are understood by victims of terrorism and political violence in both Northern Ireland (NI) and Great Britain (GB). Through engagement with practitioners, victims, survivors, and community activists, this article conceptualises the existing perceptions amongst these different groups regarding needs, the delivery of services to victims in NI and GB, and examines the origins of the different approaches. Results demonstrate that victims’ needs are highly context-dependent at a public level, but relate heavily to the experiences of other victims of terrorism and political violence at a private level.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)464-482
JournalTerrorism and Political Violence
Volume29
Issue number3
Early online date25 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Identity
  • Needs
  • Northern Ireland
  • Victims

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