Using visual direction in three-dimensional motion perception

Julie Harris, VF Drga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The eyes receive slightly different views of the world, and the differences between their images (binocular disparity) are used to see depth. Several authors have suggested how the brain could exploit this information for three-dimensional (3D) motion perception, but here we consider a simpler strategy. Visual direction is the angle between the direction of an object and the direction that an observer faces. Here we describe human behavioral experiments in which observers use visual direction, rather than binocular information, to estimate an object's 3D motion even though this causes them to make systematic errors. This suggests that recent models of binocular 3D motion perception may not reflect the strategies that human observers actually use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-233
Number of pages5
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

Keywords

  • OPTIC FLOW
  • IN-DEPTH
  • LOCOMOTION
  • PRECISION
  • GUIDANCE
  • TARGET
  • FOOT

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