Unravelling the complex interplay between antibiotic consumption and adaptive changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Sebastiaan J van Hal*, Slade O Jensen, Stephen Y C Tong, Stephen Bentley, Matthew T Holden

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Objectives
This study aims to elucidate the genomic dynamics driving the emergence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), with a specific focus on the interplay between AMR and antimicrobial usage.

Methods
We conducted a comprehensive analysis using a ST239 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) dataset over a continuous 12-year period from a single hospital. Genomic analyses were performed tracking the changes in MRSA populations, particularly the emergence of reduced vancomycin susceptibility, and assessing the impact of glycopeptide use on these emergence events.

Results
Our findings reveal a significant correlation between hospital glycopeptide usage and the selection of MRSA strains with reduced vancomycin susceptibility. Genomic analyses provided insights into the molecular mechanisms driving resistance emergence, including the slowing of the molecular clock rate in response to heightened antimicrobial consumption.

Conclusions
In conclusion, this study the highlights the complex dynamics between AMR and antimicrobial use at the hospital level. The observed correlation between antimicrobial consumption and the development of less susceptible MRSA strains underscores the importance of antimicrobial stewardship programmes and the establishment of optimal consumption thresholds for mitigating AMR effectively.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)891–896
JournalJournal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Volume79
Issue number4
Early online date27 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

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