Uncoupling the links between male mating tactics and female attractiveness

A F Ojanguren, A E Magurran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because not all females are equally attractive, and because mating reduces the chances of getting further copulations, males should prefer better-quality mates. In this paper, we use the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) to explore the effects of two non-correlated measures of female quality-size and reproductive status-on male mating decisions. All male guppies employ two alternative mating tactics. We found that large females, particularly those from a high predation site, were the target of most sneaky mating attempts. The response persisted in fish raised under standard conditions over several generations in the laboratory. In addition, nonpregnant females received more courtship displays. We conclude that males can discriminate among females and that they uncouple their mating tactics to track different axes of quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S427-S429
Number of pages3
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
Volume271
Issue numberSuppl. 6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Dec 2004

Keywords

  • mating preferences
  • female size
  • sneaky mating
  • sigmoid displays
  • Trinidadian guppy
  • Poecilia reticulata
  • GUPPY POECILIA-RETICULATA
  • MUTUAL MATE CHOICE
  • SIZE DIMORPHISM
  • LIFE-HISTORY
  • CONSEQUENCES
  • SELECTION
  • FISHES
  • COSTS
  • RISK

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