Treatment of cryptococcal meningitis in resource limited settings

Derek J Sloan, Martin J Dedicoat, David G Lalloo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cryptococcal meningitis most commonly occurs in advanced HIV. Although diminishing in the developed world with antiretroviral therapy (ART), it remains a major problem in resource-limited settings. ART rollout will improve long-term HIV survival if opportunistic infections are effectively treated. Considering cryptococcal meningitis in that context, this review addresses excess morbidity and mortality in developing countries, treatment in areas of limited drug availability and challenges posed by combined anticryptococcal and HIV therapy.

RECENT FINDINGS: From Early Fungicidal Activity (EFA) studies, amphotericin B-flucytosine is best induction therapy but often unavailable; high dose amphotericin B monotherapy may be feasible in some settings. Where fluconazole is the only option, higher doses are more fungicidal. Serum cryptococcal antigen testing may identify patients at highest disease risk and primary prophylaxis is effective; the clinical role of such interventions needs to be established. Timing of ART introduction remains controversial; early initiation risks Immune Reconstitution Disease (IRD) delays may increase mortality.

SUMMARY: Amphotericin B based treatment is appropriate where possible. More studies are needed to optimize fluconazole monotherapy doses. Other research priorities include management of raised intracranial pressure, appropriate ART initiation and IRD treatment. Studies should focus on developing countries where problems are greatest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-63
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Infectious Diseases
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

Keywords

  • AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections
  • Amphotericin B
  • Antifungal Agents
  • Developing Countries
  • Fluconazole
  • HIV Infections
  • Humans
  • Meningitis, Cryptococcal

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