Towards increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields

Likai Song, Zhanglong Liu, Pavanjeet Kaur, Jackie M. Esquiaqui, Robert I. Hunter, Stephen Hill, Graham M. Smith, Gail E. Fanucci

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W- (∼95 GHz) and D-band (∼140 GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100 ps to 2 ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232 nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50 μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20 μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-196
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance
Volume265
Early online date15 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016

Keywords

  • EPR
  • High field
  • Spin label
  • IDP
  • RNA

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Towards increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this