Towards a clarification of spatial processing

John Gerard Quinn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three experiments that adopt an interference paradigm to investigate characteristics of a type of movement causing interference with spatial processing are reported. Experiment 1 illustrates the importance of distinguishing between movement and attention to movement when investigating the movement characteristics of spatial processing. The technique of passive movement is used to minimize attention in the subsequent experiments. Experiment 2 confirms earlier experiments showing that passive movement causes interference in spatial processing. However, it extends the previous findings by demonstrating that passive movement is detrimental to spatial processing only when the movement is to a sequence of locations known in advance by the subjects. Experiment 3 demonstrates that the movement interference cannot be interpreted as a general interference effect but that it is selective for spatial processing. The results of these experiments permit a more precise delineation of the disruptive effects of movement in spatial processing and allow an explicit definition of spatial processing to be put forward.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-80
Number of pages16
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology: Section A Human Experimental Psychology
Volume47
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - May 1994

Keywords

  • SHORT-TERM-MEMORY
  • WORKING MEMORY
  • WORD-LENGTH
  • SCRATCH-PAD
  • MOVEMENT
  • SPEECH
  • STATE

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