Toward a resolution of inconsistencies in the phonological deficit theory of reading disorders: Phonological reading difficulties are more severe in high-IQ poor readers

Rhona S. Johnston, Marjorie Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether high- and low-IQ poor readers differed in patterns of reading performance. Ten-year-old poor readers with IQ scores of 110 and higher showed difficulty in taking a phonological approach to reading, failing to show an advantage in reading high-frequency regular versus irregular words and showing impaired nonword reading accuracy for their reading age. However, poor readers with IQ scores of 90 and below showed a more phonological approach to reading, with better reading of regular than irregular words of both high and low frequency, and with nonword reading skills slower than, but as accurate as, those of reading-age controls. We concluded that the high-IQ poor readers experienced difficulty in taking a phonological approach to reading, whereas the low-IQ poor readers had much less marked phonological problems, supporting Stanovich's phonological-core variable-difference model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-79
Number of pages14
JournalBritish Journal of Learning Disabilities
Volume40
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Keywords

  • LEARNING-DISABLED READERS
  • VARIABLE-DIFFERENCE MODEL
  • SHORT-TERM-MEMORY
  • DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA
  • WORD RECOGNITION
  • CHILDREN
  • REGULARITY
  • SKILLS
  • DISABILITIES
  • INFORMATION

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