Time course of neural responses discriminating different views of the face and head

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Abstract

1. Measurements of the magnitude and time course of response were made from 44 cells responsive to static head views at different levels of stimulus effectiveness. In this way responses to complex stimulus patterns evoking good, poor, and midrange responses could be compared across the cell population.

2. Cells exhibiting both good and poor initial discrimination between head views were found at short and long latencies; there was no correlation of any of the temporal response parameters measured with cell response latency.

3. The time course of the population response to the most effective stimuli showed a rapid increase to a peak firing rate (onset to peak, rise time, 58 ms) that was on average 115 spikes/s above spontaneous activity (S/A), followed by slower decay (decay time, 93 ms) to a maintained discharged rate (15% of the peak rate above S/A).

4. Discrimination between responses to different head views exhibited by the population showed a sharp rise and reached highly significant levels within 25 ms after the population's response onset.

5. On average, activity in a single neuron (the Average Cell) rises to 44% of its peak response rate within 5 ms of the response onset.

6. The Average Cell also showed exceptionally fast discrimination between views, significant within 5 ms of response onset.

7. It is argued that the fast rise in firing rate, followed by a decay to a lower rate and the very fast emergence of discrimination are features of pattern processing present in real neural systems that are lacking in many processing models based on artificial networks of neuronlike elements, particularly those where discrimination relies on top-down and/or lateral competitive inhibition.

8. It is concluded that the only way to account for the rapid discrimination is to consider a coding system in which the first spike from multiple sources is used to transmit information between stages of processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-84
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume68
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1992

Keywords

  • INFERIOR TEMPORAL NEURONS
  • TWO-DIMENSIONAL PATTERNS
  • SINGLE UNITS
  • VISUAL RESPONSES
  • RHESUS-MONKEY
  • INFEROTEMPORAL CORTEX
  • CORTICAL CONNECTIONS
  • RECEPTIVE-FIELDS
  • STRIATE CORTEX
  • MACAQUE

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