There and back again: a review of residence and return migrations in sharks with implications for population structure and management

Demian Chapman, Kevin Feldheim, Yannis Papastamatiou, Robert Hueter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

239 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The overexploitation of sharks has become a global environmental issue in need of a comprehensive and multifaceted management response. Tracking studies are beginning to elucidate how shark movements shape the internal
dynamics and structure of populations, which determine the most appropriate scale of these management efforts. Tracked sharks frequently either remain in a restricted geographic area for an extended period of time (residency) or return to a previously resided-in area after making long-distance movements (site fidelity). Genetic studies have shown that some individuals of certain species preferentially return to their exact birthplaces (natal philopatry) or birth regions (regional philopatry) for either parturition or mating, even though they make long-distance movements that would allow them to breed elsewhere. More than 80 peer-reviewed articles, constituting the majority of published shark tracking and population genetic studies, provide evidence of at least one of these behaviors in a combined 31 shark species from six of the eight extant orders. Residency, site fidelity, and philopatry can alone or in combination structure many coastal shark populations on finer geographic scales than expected based on their potential for dispersal. This information should therefore be used to scale and inform assessment, management, and conservation activities intended to restore depleted shark populations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-570
Number of pages23
JournalAnnual Review of Marine Science
Volume7
Early online date18 Sept 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Philopatry
  • Tracking
  • Telemetry
  • Genetics
  • Population dynamics
  • Conservation

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