The stereoscopic anisotropy: Individual differences and underlying mechanisms

Paul Barry Hibbard, MF Bradshaw, K Langley, BJ Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Observers are more sensitive to variations in the depth of stereoscopic surfaces in a vertical than in a horizontal direction; however, there are large individual differences in this anisotropy. The authors measured discrimination thresholds for surfaces slanted about a vertical axis or inclined about a horizontal axis for 50 observers. Orientation and spatial frequency discrimination thresholds were also measured. For most observers, thresholds were lower for inclination than for slant and lower for orientation than for spatial frequency. There was a positive correlation between the 2 anisotropies, resulting from positive correlations between (a) orientation and inclination thresholds and (b) spatial frequency and slant thresholds. These results support the notion that surface inclination and slant perception is in part limited by the sensitivity of orientation and spatial frequency mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-476
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume28
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2002

Keywords

  • SPATIAL-FREQUENCY
  • ORIENTATION DISPARITY
  • SLANT PERCEPTION
  • VISUAL-CORTEX
  • STEREOPSIS
  • SURFACES
  • VISION
  • DISCRIMINATION
  • DEPTH
  • SENSITIVITY

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