The role of myostain and the calcineurin-signalling pathway in regulating muscle mass in response to exercise training in the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum

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Abstract

Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum were exercised at 0.8 and 1.6 body lengths s(-1) for 18 h a day over a 30 day period. Exercise resulted in a 24-30% increase in the average cross-sectional area of fast muscle fibres relative to tank-rested controls. The concentrations of growth factors and transcription factors hypothesised to play a role in regulating exercise-induced muscle fibre hypertrophy were measured. Exercise training resulted in a minor increase in calcineurin localisation in the nucleus. However, nuclear factor of T-cells 2 (NFAT2) nuclear localisation did not follow a pattern that was consistent with NFAT2-mediated transcriptional activity and changes in calcineurin signaling. The active peptide of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth in mammals, was downregulated in exercise groups relative to tank-rested controls, but only by 6-7%. It was concluded that myostatin and calcineurin signaling do not play a major role in regulating exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy in trout.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2083-2090
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume208
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • rainbow trout
  • Oncorhynchus mykiss
  • exercise
  • muscle
  • hypertrophy
  • calcineurin
  • NFAT2
  • myostatin
  • HUMAN SKELETAL-MUSCLE
  • TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS
  • ATLANTIC SALMON
  • HEALTHY-MEN
  • BROOK TROUT
  • EXPRESSION
  • GROWTH
  • PROTEINS
  • GENE
  • HYPERTROPHY

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