The role of flavonoids produced in response to cyst nematode infection of Arabidopsis thaliana

John T. Jones*, Cleber Furlanetto, Mark S. Phillips

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Flavonoids have diverse roles in plants, including defence against plant pathogens and regulation of local auxin transport. Flavonoids have been shown to be produced in feeding sites of root-knot nematodes induced in a leguminous plant, and it has previously been suggested that they may be responsible for manipulation of local auxin levels that underlie early feeding site development. Here we show that flavonoids are also produced in developing syncytia induced by Heterodera schachtii and in galls induced by Xiphinema diversicaudatum in a non-leguminous plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We further investigated whether flavonoids are required for normal feeding site development by screening mutant lines of A. thaliana, defective in various parts of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway, with H. schachtii. None of the lines showed a reduced capacity to support nematode infection and some showed a statistically significant increase in the numbers of female nematodes that developed. These data suggest that flavonoids are produced as part of the defence response to nematode infection rather than being an integral component of the mechanisms used by nematodes to induce feeding sites.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)671-677
Number of pages7
JournalNematology
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2007

Keywords

  • auxin
  • defence response
  • feeding site
  • Heterodera schachtii
  • susceptible response
  • syncytium
  • ROOT-KNOT NEMATODES
  • PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES
  • CELL SYSTEM SYNCYTIUM
  • HETERODERA-SCHACHTII
  • CHORISMATE MUTASE
  • CHALCONE SYNTHASE
  • BASAL RESISTANCE
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • WHITE CLOVER
  • AMINO-ACIDS

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of flavonoids produced in response to cyst nematode infection of Arabidopsis thaliana'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this