The role of boundary maintenance and blurring in a UK collaborative research project: how researchers and health service managers made sense of new ways of working

Simon Smith*, Vicky Ward

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The paper investigates whether, how and in what circumstances boundary blurring or boundary maintenance is productive or destructive of sense in collaborative research based on a case study involving researchers from two universities and two principal organisational stakeholders in a local healthcare system in England between 2009 and 2012. Adopting a narrative method, using meeting observation, document analysis and interviews, we describe two key sets of activities in the evolution of collaboration, which allows us to tackle the question at two levels. Studying the production of documents and their use as boundary objects in project management meetings, we show how these were used to enable cooperation by establishing a truce between worldviews, giving participants a better feel for the game and a clearer perception of its stakes. Studying how the partnership expanded to take in other organisations besides the two formal partners, we show how the project accommodated pre-existing organisational interests but thereby sacrificed its experimental ethos. In showing how actors needed to subvert their experimental script to enact collaborative partnership, we argue for understanding and evaluating the latter as the co-produced outcome of disputes and co-orientations towards a practical ideal, not as an organisational format for knowledge co-production.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)225-233
    Number of pages9
    JournalSocial Science and Medicine
    Volume130
    Early online date18 Feb 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

    Keywords

    • Collaborative research
    • Collaborative partnership
    • Co-production
    • Co-orientation
    • Narrative
    • Boundary object
    • UK

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'The role of boundary maintenance and blurring in a UK collaborative research project: how researchers and health service managers made sense of new ways of working'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this