The quest for equal citizenship: Middle Eastern Christian narratives of migration and inclusion in the United Kingdom

Alistair Pursell Hunter, Fiona McCallum Guiney

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Abstract

This article explores how migrants experience the process of becoming (and being) citizens by taking the understudied case of Middle Eastern Christians of Iraqi and Egyptian heritage residing in the United Kingdom. It is argued that exclusion in the Middle East reinforces a sense of inclusion in the UK particularly due to the prevalence of the rule of law in the UK. However, by exploring a “clash of values” on the role of religion in society and sexual liberalization issues, it is suggested that Middle Eastern Christians’ support for equality and tolerance is not absolute, especially when they perceive societal norms as conflicting with religious teachings. Finally, the paper shows how the notion of “protective patriotism” is used by some Middle Eastern Christians to express their belonging to their new state by defending perceived societal values.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-43
Number of pages29
JournalMashriq and Mahjar
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • United Kingdom
  • Migration
  • Iraqi
  • Egyptian
  • Christian

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