The persistence of self-employment across borders: New evidence on legal immigrants to the United States

Randall K.Q. Akee*, David A. Jaeger, Konstantinos Tatsiramos

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Using recently-available data from the New Immigrant Survey, we find that previous self-employment experience in an immigrant's country of origin is an important determinant of self-employment status in the U.S.. increasing the probability of being self-employed by about 7 percent relative to an unconditional self-employment probability of about 10 percent. This effect is statistically significant and quantitatively important, being equivalent to at least 7 years of U.S.-based education. Our results improve on the previous literature by measuring home-country self-employment directly rather than relying on proxy measures.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)126-137
    Number of pages12
    JournalEconomics Bulletin
    Volume33
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 30 Aug 2013

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