The Palestine exception to academic freedom: intertwined stories from the frontlines of UK-based Palestine activism

Malaka M B Shwaikh, Rebecca Ruth Gould*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

This autobiographical co-authored essay explores how hate speech wounds within the logic of the Palestine exception, whereby Israel-critical speech is subjected to censorship and silencing that does not affect other controversial speech. Three months after the UK government's "adoption" of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's (IHRA) working definition of antisemitism in 2016, we were subjected to a series of attacks in the media, in the public sphere, and in our workplaces in connection with our Palestine-related activism and criticisms of Israeli policies from years earlier. The crackdown on academic freedom that has overtaken UK universities since 2017 has been widely condemned, but rarely has this story been told from the vantage point of those who were targeted and censored. We document here in detail how the Palestine exception to free speech and academic freedom has damaged academic freedom within the UK and silenced Palestinian voices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)752-773
JournalBiography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2020

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