The Nature of Blinkers and the Solar Transition Region

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27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Solar plasma that exists at around 10(5) K, which has traditionally been referred to as the solar transition region, is probably in a dynamic and fibril state with a small filling factor. Its origin is as yet unknown, but we suggest that it may be produced primarily by one of five different physical mechanisms, namely: the heating of cool spicular material; the containment of plasma in low-lying loops in the network; the thermal linking of cool and hot plasma at the feet of coronal loops; the heating and evaporating of chromospheric plasma in response to a coronal heating event; and the cooling and draining of hot coronal plasma when coronal heating is switched off. We suggest that, in each case, a blinker could be produced by the granular compression of a network junction, causing subtelescopic fibril flux tubes to spend more of their time at transition-region temperatures and so to increase the filling factor temporarily.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-264
Number of pages16
JournalSolar Physics
Volume205
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2002

Keywords

  • DIAGNOSTIC SPECTROMETER CDS
  • HIGH-RESOLUTION TELESCOPE
  • DOPPLER SHIFTS
  • QUIET-SUN
  • THERMAL CONDUCTION
  • CHROMOSPHERE
  • CORONA
  • SOHO
  • SUMER
  • SPICULES

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