The impact of adopting ethnic or civic conceptions of national belonging for others' treatment

J R H Wakefield, N Hopkins, C Cockburn, K M Shek, A Muirhead, Stephen David Reicher, Wendy Van Rijswijk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

National belonging is often defined in terms of “ethnic” ancestry and “civic” commitment (with the latter typically implying a more inclusive conception of belonging). The authors report three Scottish studies manipulating the prominence of these criteria. In Study 1 (N = 80), a Chinese-heritage target was judged more Scottish (and his criticisms of Scotland better received) when Scotland was defined in civic terms. In Study 2 (N = 40), a similar manipulation in a naturalistic setting showed a civic conception of belonging resulted in more help being given to a Chinese-heritage confederate. Study 3 (N = 71) replicated Study 2 and showed the effect was mediated by judgments of the confederate’s Scottishness. These studies emphasize the importance of exploring how ingroup identity is defined.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1599-1610
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume37
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

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