The human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early proteins as antagonists of intrinsic and innate antiviral host responses

Christina Paulus, Michael Nevels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The major immediate-early (IE) gene of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is believed to have a decisive role in acute infection and its activity is an important indicator of viral reactivation from latency. Although a variety of gene products are expressed from this region, the 72-kDa IE1 and the 86-kDa IE2 nuclear phosphoproteins are the most abundant and important. Both proteins have long been recognized as promiscuous transcriptional regulators. More recently, a critical role of the IE1 and IE2 proteins in counteracting non-adaptive host cell defense mechanisms has been revealed. In this review we will briefly summarize the available literature on IE1- and IE2-dependent mechanisms contributing to CMV evasion from intrinsic and innate immune responses.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)760-79
Number of pages20
JournalViruses
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

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