The effect of neighbourhood housing tenure mix on labour market outcomes: a longitudinal investigation of neighbourhood effects

Maarten Van Ham, David John Manley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    123 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article investigates the effect of different levels of neighbourhood housing tenure mix and deprivation on transitions from unemployment to employment and the probability of staying in employment for those with a job. We used multiple regression models and unique individual level data from the Scottish Longitudinal Study. We found that high correlations between the percentage of social renting in a neighbourhood and labour market outcomes disappeared when controlling for neighbourhood deprivation, individual level education and tenure. The results show that living in a deprived neighbourhood is negatively correlated with labour market performance, but predominantly for homeowners and not for social renters. We suggest that selection effects and not causation are behind the neighbourhood effects found.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)257-282
    Number of pages26
    JournalJournal of Economic Geography
    Volume10
    Issue number2
    Early online date8 May 2009
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

    Keywords

    • Tenure mix
    • Deprivation
    • Neighbourhood effects
    • Labour market transitions
    • Longitudinal
    • Scotland

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