The ecology of the avian brain: Food-storing memory and the hippocampus

JR Krebs, NS Clayton, Susan Denise Healy, DA Cristol, SN Patel, AR Jolliffe

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some species of birds store food, often hoarding several hundreds of seeds over a period of lust a few weeks. Field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that food-storing species have an impressive memory and an enlarged region of the brain, the hippocampal region. Lesion experiments have shown that the hippocampus is important in accurate retrieval of stored food. Taken together, these results have led to the hypothesis that the enlarged hippocampus is associated with the memory requirements of retrieving stored food. In this review, we discuss four areas of study: comparative studies of the brain, comparative studies of behaviour, developmental plasticity and seasonal changes in food storing and the hippocampus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages34-46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1996

Keywords

  • PIGEON COLUMBA-LIVIA
  • II MUTANT MICE
  • SPATIAL MEMORY
  • DORSOMEDIAL TELENCEPHALON
  • MARSH TITS
  • PARUS
  • BIRDS
  • SPECIALIZATION
  • RETRIEVAL
  • PARIDAE

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