The discourse of desperation: the intersections of neo-Orientalism, gender and Islam in the Chechen struggle

Caron Eileen Gentry, Kathryn Whitworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neo-Orientalism is a means of articulating a subordinating discourse regarding populations and societies associated with Islam. This article argues that the labelling of Chechens and Chechen society as ‘desperate’ is another way of upholding the neo-Orientalist frame. About 2876 articles on the Chechen conflict culled from the Lexis-Nexis database were coded for the language of ‘desperation’. A majority of these articles linked desperation to either ‘radical’ Islam or gender dynamics/women’s participation in the conflict. Thus, this article argues that the Russian–Chechen conflict is framed by the media to uphold a neo-Orientalist gaze, in which the language of desperation plays a key role, in order to delegitimise any cause the Chechens may have for fighting.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-161
JournalCritical Studies on Terrorism
Volume4
Issue number2
Early online date1 Aug 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Chechnya
  • desperation
  • Orientalism
  • gender
  • political violence
  • terrorism

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The discourse of desperation: the intersections of neo-Orientalism, gender and Islam in the Chechen struggle'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this