The cost of virtue: reward as well as feedback are required to reduce user ICT power consumption

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Abstract

We show that students in a school lab environment will change their behaviour to be more energy efficient, when appropriate incentives are in place, and when measurement-based, real-time feedback about their energy usage is provided. Rewards incentivise `non-green' users to be `green' as well as encouraging those users who already claim to be `green'. Measurement-based feedback improves user energy awareness and helps users to explore and adjust their use of computers to become `greener', but is not sufficient by itself. In our measurements, weekly mean group energy use as a whole reduced by up to 16%; and weekly individual user energy consumption reduced by up to 56% during active use. The findings are drawn from our longitudinal study that involved 83 Computer Science students; lasted 48 weeks across 2 academic years; monitored a total of 26778 hours of active computer use; collected approximately 2TB of raw data.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 5th International Conference on Future Energy Systems
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, USA
PublisherACM
Pages157-169
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-2819-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jun 2014

Publication series

Namee-Energy '14
PublisherACM

Keywords

  • Energy efficiency
  • User behaviour
  • Green ICT
  • Energy usage
  • Energy monitoring
  • Energy feedback

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