The attitudes of teachers in Scotland to the integration of children with autism into mainstream schools

Evelyn Mary McGregor, E Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Around 4600 school-age children in Scotland fall within the spectrum of autistic disorders, of whom 780 have been identified in schools. This study sought the views of 23 specialist and 49 mainstream teachers, 22 with experience of autism, 27 without. They were questioned about the advantages and disadvantages of integration into mainstream for autistic children, their own ability to cope and predictors of success. Questionnaires were issued to special units and to mainstream primary and secondary schools. A minority of mainstream respondents believed children with autism should be integrated where possible. Mainstream teachers with experience of autism showed more confidence to deal with the children than those without experience. Many expressed concerns about effects on mainstream pupils but most were willing to undertake more training. Specialist teachers were more positive, although they acknowledged possible disadvantages for both groups of children and stressed that the success of integration depends on the individual child.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-207
Number of pages19
JournalAutism
Volume5
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2001

Keywords

  • autism
  • integration
  • teachers' attitudes
  • SOCIAL-INTERACTION
  • STUDENTS
  • STRATEGIES
  • PEERS

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