Test and trace strategy has overlooked importance of clinical input, clinical oversight and integration

Louisa Harding-Edgar, Margaret McCartney, Allyson M Pollock

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From 18th May in the UK, patients, health and social care staff, and the public could arrange their own COVID-19 tests directly through government phone line or website in the absence of proper clinical input and oversight. This is despite the Royal College of Pathologists highlighting how problems with testing arise because of lack of clinical input, and emphasising how people being tested need to be informed about why they are being tested and the meaning of their results.1 In late summer 2020, multiple media outlets reported demand for tests (predominantly in England) as exceeding the capacity of the system, leaving many unable to access testing. However, this is not the only concern regarding the current UK testing system. These relate to contractual arrangements, lack of clinical integration and use of results. A new strategy is required, with clinical input, clinical oversight and integration into local primary care and public health systems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)428-432
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Volume113
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • General Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Test and trace strategy has overlooked importance of clinical input, clinical oversight and integration'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this