Teaching laboratory for large cohorts of undergraduates: private and social information in fish

Jost Borcherding, Mike M. Webster, Katja Heubel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A challenge in the Bachelor's studies in Biology is to strike a balance between reducing the teaching of practical scientific experiments to what is feasible in a short time, and teaching “real” science in undergraduate laboratories for high numbers of participants. We describe a laboratory in behavioral biology, with the primary focus on the student learning. However, also the underlying scientific question and the results of the experiment, namely the behavior of the three‐spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) in a trade‐off situation during foraging, is without a doubt timely and sufficient for scientific studies on this subject, and this through the experiments conducted and data collected by the students. The students rated this laboratory well and learned at the end that social information is certainly important, but that self‐learning can be more important, and this not only in small fish, but also for the students themselves.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalEcology and Evolution
VolumeEarly View
Early online date2 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Feeding
  • Gasterosteus aculeatus
  • Learning
  • Trade-off

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Teaching laboratory for large cohorts of undergraduates: private and social information in fish'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this