Syngas production from CO2 and H2O via solid-oxide electrolyzer cells: fundamentals, materials, degradation, operating conditions, and applications

Xiangjun Hou, Yao Jiang, Keyan Wei, Cairong Jiang, Tien-Chien Jen, Yali Yao, Xinying Liu, Jianjun Ma, John T. S. Irvine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Highly efficient coelectrolysis of CO2/H2O into syngas (a mixture of CO/H2), and subsequent syngas conversion to fuels and value-added chemicals, is one of the most promising alternatives to reach the corner of zero carbon strategy and renewable electricity storage. This research reviews the current state-of-the-art advancements in the coelectrolysis of CO2/H2O in solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOECs) to produce the important syngas intermediate. The overviews of the latest research on the operating principles and thermodynamic and kinetic models are included for both oxygen-ion- and proton-conducting SOECs. The advanced materials that have recently been developed for both types of SOECs are summarized. It later elucidates the necessity and possibility of regulating the syngas ratios (H2:CO) via changing the operating conditions, including temperature, inlet gas composition, flow rate, applied voltage or current, and pressure. In addition, the sustainability and widespread application of SOEC technology for the conversion of syngas is highlighted. Finally, the challenges and the future research directions in this field are addressed. This review will appeal to scientists working on renewable-energy-conversion technologies, CO2 utilization, and SOEC applications. The implementation of the technologies introduced in this review offers solutions to climate change and renewable-power-storage problems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5119-5166
Number of pages48
JournalChemical Reviews
Volume124
Issue number8
Early online date15 Apr 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Apr 2024

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