Surface orientation, modulation frequency and the detetion and perception of depth defined by binocular disparity adn motion parallax

Mark F Bradshaw, Paul Barry Hibbard, Andrew D Parton, David Rose, Keith Langley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Binocular disparity and motion parallax provide information about the spatial structure and layout of the world. Descriptive similarities between the two cues have often been noted which have been taken as evidence of a close relationship between them. Here, we report two experiments which investigate the effect of surface orientation and modulation frequency on (i) a threshold detection task and (ii) a supra-threshold depth-matching task using sinusoidally corrugated surfaces defined by binocular disparity or motion parallax. For low frequency corrugations, an orientation anisotropy was observed in both domains, with sensitivity decreasing as surface orientation was varied from horizontal to vertical. In the depth-matching task, for surfaces defined by binocular disparity the greatest depth was seen for oblique orientations. For surfaces defined by motion parallax, perceived depth was found to increase as surface orientation was varied from horizontal to vertical. In neither case was perceived depth for supra-threshold surfaces related to threshold performance in any simple manner. These results reveal clear differences between the perception of depth from binocular disparity or motion parallax, and between perception at threshold and supra-threshold levels of performance. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2636-2644
Number of pages9
JournalVision Research
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2006

Keywords

  • disparity motion parallax depth processing
  • SENSITIVITY
  • CORRUGATIONS
  • COMPONENTS
  • MECHANISMS
  • ANISOTROPY
  • GRATINGS
  • SLANT

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