Sixteen common misconceptions about the evolution of cooperation in humans

Stuart A. West*, Claire El Mouden, Andy Gardner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

264 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The occurrence of cooperation poses a problem for the biological and social sciences. However, many aspects of the biological and social science literatures on this subject have developed relatively independently, with a lack of interaction. This has led to a number of misunderstandings with regard to how natural selection operates and the conditions under which cooperation can be favoured. Our aim here is to provide an accessible overview of social evolution theory and the evolutionary work on cooperation, emphasising common misconceptions. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-262
Number of pages32
JournalEvolution and Human Behavior
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Altruism
  • Fitness
  • Inclusive fitness
  • Reciprocity
  • CULTURAL-GROUP SELECTION
  • KIN SELECTION
  • INCLUSIVE FITNESS
  • STRONG RECIPROCITY
  • MULTILEVEL SELECTION
  • SEX-RATIO
  • SOCIAL EVOLUTION
  • HUMAN ALTRUISM
  • STRUCTURED POPULATIONS
  • CLEANER FISH

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