Situational trust and co-operative partnerships between physicians and their patients: a theoretical explanation transferable from business practice

Mark Roger Dibben, S E Morris, MEJ Lean

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    34 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A model to explain interpersonal trust development, and its consequences for co-operative behaviour in doctor/patient partnerships derived from the context of business relationships is applied to patient/physician relationships. Threshold barriers exist against all human behaviours or actions and trust is the process by which barriers to co-operation and compliance are overcome. Dispositional trust (a psychological trait to be trusting) is dominant in the early stages of a relationship and contributes to the weight of subsequent trust development. Go-operative behaviour or compliance ultimately requires a secure situational trust emerging from consultations, which is carried forward as learnt trust and modified in each subsequent consultation. The model comprises three types of situational trust (calculus-based, knowledge-based, and identification trust) and five co-operation criteria from which to determine an individual's tendency for cooperative behaviour. These model components can be identified and mapped from a range of qualitative data, with the aim of enhancing co-operative behaviour and efficiently achieving optimal patient compliance.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)55-61
    Number of pages7
    JournalQJM: An International Journal of Medicine
    Volume93
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2000

    Keywords

    • WEIGHT-LOSS
    • ORGANIZATION
    • DISTRUST

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