Should Quality of Life be a routine clinic measurement in head and neck cancer patients?

Gerald Michael Humphris, H King, KL Mais, GM Humphris, R Swindell, A Syke, N Slevin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quality of Life (QOL) is now a standard end-point in clinical trials. The aim of this non-cohort study was to assess the practical issues surrounding the collection of QOL data in a non-trial setting, and to determine whether it is feasible and worthwhile.

Ninety-two patients attending clinics before, or at least 3 months after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were asked to complete the University of Washington QOL questionnaire (Version 4) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

The three most important QOL domains cited by patient, after radiotherapy related to saliva production, swallowing and taste. Most patients were able to complete both questionnaires in less than 10 min and reported little difficulty in understanding and completing them. The questionnaires indicated possible clinically significant levels of anxiety and depression in 31% and 16%, respectively.

We perceived several benefits of routine QOL data collection in the clinic and this has now been adopted in our own practice. (C) 2003 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-210
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Oncology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

Keywords

  • head and neck cancer
  • quality of life
  • radiotherapy
  • PERFORMANCE STATUS SCALE
  • FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT
  • RADIATION-THERAPY
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • INSTRUMENT
  • ANXIETY
  • TRIALS

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