Should I stay or should I go: biogeographic and evolutionary history of a polyploid complex (Chrysanthemum indicum complex) in response to Pleistocene climate change in China.

J Li, Q Wan, Y-P Guo, Richard John Abbott, G-Y Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quaternary climatic oscillations greatly influenced the distribution and pattern of biodiversity in the Northern Hemisphere. Here we examine how such oscillations in South East Asia may have affected the demographic and evolutionary history of a polyploid plant complex associated with semi-dry habitats.
We analyzed plastid and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence variation within the Chrysanthemum indicum complex (Asteraceae), which comprises diploid and polyploid plants distributed throughout China. In total, 368 individuals from 47 populations across the geographical range of the complex were analyzed.
We show that the relatively widespread tetraploid form of C. indicum expanded its range southward in the Pleistocene, possibly during the most recent or previous glacial period when conditions became drier and forests retreated in southern China. In marked contrast, diploid and other polyploid members of the complex failed to expand their ranges at these times or have since undergone range contractions in contrast to tetraploid C. indicum.
We conclude that hybridization and gene flow between taxa occurred frequently during the evolutionary history of the complex, causing considerable sharing of chlorotypes and ITS types. Nevertheless, taxa within ploidy levels could be largely distinguished according to chlorotype and/or ITS type.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1031-1044
Number of pages14
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume201
Issue number3
Early online date11 Nov 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • biogeography
  • Chrysanthemum indicum complex
  • hybridization
  • polyploidy
  • Quaternary climatic oscillation
  • range expansion

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