Sexual conflict, sex allocation and the genetic system

David Michael Shuker, Anna M. Moynihan, Laura Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Decisions over what sex ratio to produce can have far-reaching evolutionary consequences, for both offspring and parents. However, the extent to which males and females come into evolutionary conflict over aspects of sex allocation depends on the genetic system: when genes are passed to the next generation unequally by the two sexes (as in haplodiploidy, for example), this biased transmission can facilitate a range of conflicts not seen in diploids. However, much less attention has been paid to these forms of sexual conflict, not least because it has not always been clear how the conflicts could be realized. Here we consider how biased gene transmission, as expressed in different genetic systems, enhances the opportunity for sex ratio conflict and give empirical examples that confirm that males and females have the opportunity to influence sex ratios.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)682-685
Number of pages4
JournalBiology Letters
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Oct 2009

Keywords

  • sexual conflict
  • sex allocation
  • sex ratio
  • nasonia
  • hymenoptera
  • WASP NASONIA-VITRIPENNIS
  • SOCIAL HYMENOPTERA
  • RATIO CONFLICT
  • EVOLUTION

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