Sex differences in behaviour as an indirect consequence of mating system

A E Magurran, M Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A considerable literature has been devoted to documenting differences between the sexes. However, relatively little attention has hitherto been directed towards those differences that arise as an indirect consequence of mating system even though they can have profound implications for the daily lives of the animals involved. In this review we focus on differences in the non-reproductive behaviour of fish and relate these to sexual dimorphism in size and morphology, and to variance in fitness between the sexes. In line with our expectation, differences in distributional ecology, schooling, aggression, predator avoidance and foraging are exaggerated in sexually dimorphic species and polygamous mating systems. Nonetheless, the behaviour of males and females may also differ in sexually monomorphic and monogamous species. We conclude by highlighting promising directions for further research. (C) 2000 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-857
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Fish Biology
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2000

Keywords

  • sexual dimorphism
  • polygamy
  • reproductive success
  • predator avoidance
  • foraging
  • GUPPY POECILIA-RETICULATA
  • LIFE-HISTORIES
  • FORAGING INNOVATION
  • TRINIDADIAN GUPPIES
  • SELECTIVE PREDATION
  • SCHOOLING BEHAVIOR
  • BLUEGILL SUNFISH
  • SIZE DIMORPHISM
  • VIVIPAROUS FISH
  • FEMALE MIMICRY

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