Serum albumin inhibits echovirus 7 uncoating

T Ward, RM Powell, DJ Evans, JW Almond*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Echoviruses induce a wide spectrum of diseases in man, the most severe being meningitis. In neonates, however, a severe systemic infection can be observed, leading to death. Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in plasma and most interstitial fluids, and its functions include osmoregulation and transport and delivery of hydrophobic molecules such as fatty acids and steroids. The results of cold-synchronized one-step growth analysis of echovirus 7 infection and sucrose-gradient analysis of A-particles suggest that physiological concentrations of albumin block echovirus 7 infection by inhibiting uncoating. The blockage was reversible and was still effective when albumin was added 30 min after virus adsorption. Inhibition of uncoating was confirmed by using rhodanine, a known specific inhibitor of echovirus uncoating. After removal of the albumin blockage, addition of rhodanine perpetuated the inhibition. Serum and interstitial albumin concentrations may limit echovirus infection in vivo and thereby act as an extracellular determinant for echovirus tropism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-290
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume80
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1999

Keywords

  • DECAY-ACCELERATING FACTOR
  • FACTOR CD55
  • RECEPTOR
  • BINDING
  • CELLS
  • PROTEIN
  • NEUTRALIZATION
  • RHODANINE
  • REQUIRES
  • FORMS

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