Selective Imitation of In-Group Over Out-Group Members in 14-Month-Old Infants

David Buttelmann*, Norbert Zmyj, Moritz Daum, Malinda Carpenter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

246 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has shown that infants are more likely to engage with in-group over out-group members. However, it is not known whether infants' learning is influenced by a model's group membership. This study investigated whether 14-month-olds (N=66) selectively imitate and adopt the preferences of in-group versus out-group members. Infants watched an adult tell a story either in their native language (in-group) or a foreign language (out-group). The adult then demonstrated a novel action (imitation task) and chose 1 of 2 objects (preference task). Infants did not show selectivity in the preference task, but they imitated the in-group model more faithfully than the out-group model. This suggests that cultural learning is beginning to be truly cultural by 14months of age.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-428
Number of pages7
JournalChild Development
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • SOCIAL COGNITION
  • MODELS
  • PEDAGOGY
  • CHILDREN
  • PEER

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