Selective habituation shapes acoustic predator recognition in harbour seals

VB Deecke, Peter James Bramwell Slater, JKB Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

142 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Predation is a major force in shaping the behaviour of animals(1-3), so that precise identification of predators will confer substantial selective advantages on animals that serve as food to others. Because experience with a predator can be lethal, early researchers studying birds suggested that predator recognition does not require learning(4,5). However, a predator image that can be modified by learning and experience will be advantageous in situations where cues associated with the predator are highly variable or change over time. In this study, we investigated the response of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) to the underwater calls of different populations of killer whales (Orcinus orca). We found that the seals responded strongly to the calls of mammal-eating killer whales and unfamiliar fish-eating killer whales but not to the familiar calls of the local fish-eating population. This demonstrates that wild harbour seals are capable of complex acoustic discrimination and that they modify their predator image by selectively habituating to the calls of harmless killer whales. Fear in these animals is therefore focused on local threats by learning and experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-173
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume420
Issue number6912
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Nov 2002

Keywords

  • WHALES ORCINUS-ORCA
  • KILLER WHALES
  • BRITISH-COLUMBIA
  • GENETIC DIFFERENTIATION
  • POPULATIONS
  • BEHAVIOR
  • EVOLUTION
  • WATERS

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Selective habituation shapes acoustic predator recognition in harbour seals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this