Scotland's demographic regime: population and politics

Elspeth Forbes Graham, Paul Joseph Boyle

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Scotland, with just over 5 million inhabitants, is a small country relative to most of its neighbours in Europe, including England. Under the recently (re)established Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, devolved responsibilities have provided a new context within which the characteristics of its demographic regime have come to be seen as problematic. In this paper we review the empirical evidence underpinning political perceptions of a population 'crisis' in Scotland and argue that spatial comparisons have been particularly influential in this politicisation of population. We then examine the dimensions of the population debate through the voices of politicians and the media. We conclude with a brief consideration of the relationships between population and devolved politics, suggesting a direction for policy-relevant research to which population geographers could make a major contribution.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)361-382
    Number of pages22
    JournalScottish Geographical Journal
    Volume119
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • Scottish population
    • devolved politics
    • population geographies
    • population policies
    • ADJUSTMENT PROCESSES
    • HIGH EMIGRATION
    • HIGH FERTILITY
    • LOW NUPTIALITY
    • EXPERIENCE
    • TRANSITION
    • HISTORY
    • EUROPE
    • HEALTH

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