Sarah Sophia Banks, Adam Afzelius and a Coin from Sierra Leone

Catherine Eagleton*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1792, this penny for use in Sierra Leone was struck in Birmingham, UK, on the new steam-powered coining presses at the Soho Mint. This method of manufacturing coins, developed through a partnership between Birmingham entrepreneur Matthew Boulton and Scottish engineer James Watt, revolutionized the production of small change—a constant problem throughout the history of money—since it meant that large numbers of identical low-denomination coins could be produced cheaply and quickly, for the first time.1

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPalgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Cultures of Print
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages203-205
Number of pages3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Publication series

NamePalgrave Studies in the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Cultures of Print
ISSN (Print)2634-6516
ISSN (Electronic)2634-6524

Keywords

  • African Association
  • British Museum
  • Imperial Expansion
  • Paper Money
  • Romantic Colonization

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sarah Sophia Banks, Adam Afzelius and a Coin from Sierra Leone'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this