Retrieval-induced forgetting in eyewitness memory: Forgetting as a consequence of remembering

Malcolm David MacLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent psychological research on memory has demonstrated that the act of remembering can also prompt forgetting, or more specifically, the inhibition of particular items in memory (i.e. retrieval-induced forgetting). Extending this line of inquiry, this article reports the findings from two studies designed to establish whether retrieval-induced forgetting can occur for meaningful stimuli that could be experienced under eyewitness situations. In Study 1, participants were asked to recall previously presented household items that had ostensibly been stolen in burglaries, while in Study 2, participants were asked to recall descriptive details about two individuals suspected of making bogus money collections. Both studies provided unequivocal evidence that retrieval-induced forgetting can occur for such meaningful stimuli. Importantly, in each case it was demonstrated that the observed effects could not be attributed to output interference. This article considers the likely extent of the problem posed by retrieval-induced forgetting for eyewitness reliability and some of the practical and theoretical implications of this work. Copyright (C) 2002 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-149
Number of pages15
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2002

Keywords

  • INTERVIEW
  • RECALL
  • MODEL
  • FIELD

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Retrieval-induced forgetting in eyewitness memory: Forgetting as a consequence of remembering'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this