Response to late Bronze Age climate change of farming communities in north east Scotland

Richard Tipping*, Althea Lynn Davies, Robert McCulloch, Eileen Tisdall

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Pollen analyses are presented spanning the Bronze and Iron Ages at two sites within one river catchment in north east Scotland, one upland and one lowland site, to test the hypothesis that subsistence agricultural communities relocated their activities in response to major climatic deterioration at the end of the Bronze Age. Such responses were identified, involving the probable cessation of arable farming around the upland site and increases in the intensity of anthropogenic impacts around the lowland site. These changes are consistent with a model that posits a restructuring of agricultural activities, but are not considered indicative of settlement abandonment in the face of climatic stress. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2379-2386
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
    Volume35
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008

    Keywords

    • HISTORY
    • later prehistory
    • northern Scotland
    • HUMAN IMPACT
    • SUTHERLAND
    • SCOTTISH SPELEOTHEM
    • land-uses
    • ERUPTION
    • climate change
    • RECORDS
    • marginality
    • TELECONNECTIONS
    • HOLOCENE
    • LAKE-SEDIMENTS
    • RECONSTRUCTION

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