Representing space and objects in monkeys and apes

J Call*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primate foraging con be construed as a set of interconnected problems that include finding food, selecting efficient travel routes, anticipating the positions of moving prey, and manipulating, and occasionally, extracting food items using tools. The evidence reviewed in this paper strongly suggests that both monkeys and apes use three types of representation (i.e., static, dynamic, and relational) to solve various problems. Static representations involve recoiling certain features of the environment, dynamic representations involve imagining changes in the trajectories of moving objects, and relational representations involve encoding the properties of objects in relation to other objects. Contrary to previous claims, no clear differences were found between the representational skills of monkeys and apes. Current evidence also suggests that primates may be better at representing general compared to specific problem features. Finally, we have characterized the domains of space and objects as complementary and indicated future lines of research in these domains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-422
Number of pages26
JournalCognitive Science
Volume24
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • CHIMPANZEES PAN-TROGLODYTES
  • LONG-TAILED MACAQUES
  • GORILLA-GORILLA-GORILLA
  • CAPUCHIN MONKEYS
  • CEBUS-APELLA
  • SPATIAL MEMORY
  • MACACA-FASCICULARIS
  • PONGO-PYGMAEUS
  • SAIMIRI-SCIUREUS
  • FORAGING TASK

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