Remembrance of remembrance past

Michelle Marie Arnold, D S Lindsay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arnold and Lindsay (2002) found that individuals more often failed to remember they had previously recalled an item if that item had been cued in a qualitatively different way on two recall occasions: the "forgot-it-all-along" (FIA) effect. Experiment 1 was designed to determine if the FIA effect arises because participants incorrectly believe they have not been previously tested for an item, or because they incorrectly believe they have failed to recall the item when previously tested. Experiment 2 measured participants' confidence in their incorrect prior-recall judgements, and Experiment 3 tested participants' ability to "recover" their previous recollection when the prior-recall context was restored. Results indicated that participants usually believed they had not previously been cued for the items they failed to remember previously recalling; they were often confident in their incorrect judgements of prior non-remembering; and re-introducing the context of prior remembering sometimes enabled them to recapture their memories of previous recall.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-549
Number of pages17
JournalMemory
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

Keywords

  • REMEMBERED EVENTS
  • AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY
  • EPISODIC MEMORY
  • FALSE MEMORIES
  • RECALL
  • RECOGNITION
  • PERSPECTIVE
  • ACCOUNT
  • SYSTEM
  • SCHOOL

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Remembrance of remembrance past'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this