Remembering remembering

Michelle Marie Arnold, D S Lindsay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We developed a laboratory analogue of the "forgot-it-all-along" effect that J. W. Schooler, M. Bendiksen, and Z. Ambadar (1997) proposed for cases of "recovered memories" in which individuals had forgotten episodes of talking about the abuse when they were supposedly amnestic for it. In Experiment 1, participants studied homographs with disambiguating context words; in Test I they received studied- or other-context words as cues; and in Test 2 they received studied-context cues and judged whether they had recalled each item during Test 1. In Experiment 2, retrieval cues were manipulated on both tests. In Experiment 3, both the studied- and other-context cues corresponded to the same meaning of each homograph. In Experiment 4, Test I was free recall, and studied- versus other-context cues were presented in Test 2. Participants more often forgot that they had previously recalled an item if they were cued to think of it differently on the two tests.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)521-529
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2002

Keywords

  • ENCODING SPECIFICITY
  • RETRIEVAL PROCESSES
  • EPISODIC MEMORY
  • RECOGNITION
  • HOMOGRAPHS
  • FAMILIARITY
  • CONTEXT
  • NORMS
  • WORD

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